Is treatment cheaper by ALS medical marijuana in michigan

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ALS medical marijuana in michigan

Medical marijuana use is legal in fourteen states, including Michigan. But it’s still controversial, and several medical associations remain opposed to it. Among them is the American Academy of Neurology, which has come out against using pot for Lou Gehrig’s disease — also known as ALS or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis — because there’s insufficient evidence of its safety or efficacy. This even though over 20,000 patients across the nation are taking ALS medical marijuana treatment in michigan.

 “The assumption by some physicians is that nothing has been approved for this serious condition and therefore it is not reasonable to prescribe,” said Dr. Barth Wilsey, an associate professor at the University of California at San Diego. “Alternative therapies, by definition, are not well understood and therefore carry greater risk than conventional medicine.” While he is concerned about lack of long-term data on the safety of marijuana for ALS, Dr. Wilsey also points out that marijuana is much cheaper in Michigan than in California, where medical pot has been legal for longer. On average, the price of prescription cannabinoids in Michigan is $60 per month. In California, where it’s legal for all patients, not just those with a doctor’s recommendation like in Michigan, the cost is over five times higher at almost $300 per month.

How do you use medical marijuana?

Medical marijuana would only be used after drugs treatments using popularly used medicines have been tried. Marijuana associate with many other drugs.

It can be effective if taken with medicines that cause sleepiness or control mood. Those are sedatives, anxiety drugs, or antidepressants.

Cannabis reduces blood sugar and blood pressure, so use caution when you take cannabis for these conditions. It also improves the options of bleeding when you are experiencing blood thinners.

This is usually smoked. It may also be brewed into tea, vaporized, sprayed below the tongue, used into the skin, or cooked in food.

We spoke this week to Mark Smith, one of three owners of GB Sciences, a Las Vegas company that owns Canna Help Patient Care Centers in seven states, including Michigan. CannaHelp is a newly formed subsidiary of GB Sciences that provides ALS medical marijuana in michigan for patients with ALS and other debilitating diseases.

 “We have to be very selective about each state we operate in,” said Smith, “and it’s a regulatory challenge to keep up with the new regulations and laws that govern each state.” According to Smith, ALS is one of many diseases for which medical marijuana has been proven effective.

ALS is characterized by progressive weakness, muscular atrophy, and respiratory failure. Most patients die within two to five years after the onset of symptoms. Sixty percent are dead three years after diagnosis. The average life expectancy from the date of diagnosis is only 38 months.

“The probability that a neurologist will see a patient with ALS is only .08 percent per year,” said Dr. Wilsey, “and the probability of seeing two such patients in one year is one percent.”

“It would make sense to have more than just anecdotal reports on the safety and efficacy of marijuana for ALS,” said Dr. Wilsey. But evidence from other sources such as the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System does not show any severe problems with cannabis use for ALS. Data on the potential long-term effects of marijuana in patients with ALS “are still lacking,” he said, “but they must exist if physicians are proposing to prescribe this drug to their patients.”

ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects the brain and spinal cord.

 2. There is no cure for ALS, and disease progression is inevitable, although life expectancy can be significantly extended with palliative care in some instances. Most people die from respiratory failure due to paralysis of the diaphragm.

3. Symptoms include muscle weakness, especially in legs and arms, twitching of facial muscles, difficulty moving, speaking, and swallowing. These symptoms can be disabling and advance over months to years.

 4. The cause of ALS is unknown, but there may be a genetic component or environmental factors such as head trauma, viral infections, or toxins that increase the risk for the disease.

5. No medications have been approved by Food and Drug Administration specifically for ALS treatment, although a class of drugs called Riluzole may modestly prolong life by 2-3 months.

6. Marijuana is effective at treating symptoms of ALS, including pain, extreme weight loss, and nausea from other medications (e.g., opioids).

 7. Some small clinical studies have shown significant improvement in muscular strength and ability to perform basic tasks such as handling utensils, eating, and turning over in bed after marijuana was prescribed.

8. Marijuana is a Schedule 1 controlled substance with no approved treatment or medical use by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA). In Michigan, patients can legally use medical cannabis with a doctor’s recommendation. Still, physicians are restricted to prescribing only 4 ounces per patient per two-week period.

9. The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System has not shown any severe problems with marijuana use for ALS. However, many patients are likely not correctly diagnosed or under-reported because of the numerous state restrictions on medical cannabis and lack of awareness by patients and physicians about its efficacy in treating symptoms associated with ALS, including pain, nausea, and loss of appetite.

10. Long-term effects of marijuana use cannot be determined for ALS patients since data are lacking. Still, there have been no reports of significant adverse events or findings on MRI in cannabis users with the disease.

11. The biggest challenge facing patients is the lack of awareness about this treatment among physicians and fear related to its Schedule 1 status.

12. Support is needed further to research the effects of marijuana on ALS symptoms and increase physician awareness about the potential benefits of cannabis treatment for patients with ALS to improve quality of life and potentially prolong survival.

13. For more information on this topic, contact Dr. Sunil Aggarwal at 810-762-7036.

14. For information on our monthly support group for patients with ALS and their caregivers, please phone 734-973-4592 or visit alsmi.org.

15. The ALS Association is the only national non-profit organization fighting Lou Gehrig’s Disease on every front.

16. Established in 1984, The ALS Association chapters provide care services to over 17,000 individuals with ALS in the United States and Canada. Different types of techniques are available on our website where you can apply for marijuana card by online. If you face any obstacles visit our website and get relief from pain which you face for treatment.

Disease and potential treatments, including cannabis-based medicines

 2. Medical marijuana has been proven effective for patients with ALS, but there are still questions about its safety and efficacy in treating people with this debilitating disease

3. ALS is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disease that causes muscles in the body to weaken and atrophy over time. The majority of patients die within 2-5 years from respiratory failure caused by paralysis of the diaphragm muscle.

4. There are projections that as many as 30,000 people in the U.S. with ALS medical marijuana in michigan will have died from the disease by 2020.

5. No FDA-approved medications are available to treat ALS or its symptoms, and only one remedy, Riluzole, received FDA approval for 2-3 month prolongation of life. Still, only 1% of patients treated with this drug live longer than two years.

6. Marijuana (cannabis) has been shown in studies to treat symptoms of ALS, including pain, appetite stimulation, and sleep disturbances from other medications often prescribed for patients with the disease.

7. Some small clinical studies have shown significant improvement in muscular strength and ability to perform basic tasks such as handling utensils, eating, and turning over in bed after marijuana was prescribed.

8. Marijuana is a Schedule 1 controlled substance with no approved treatment or medical use by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA). In Michigan, patients can legally use medical cannabis with a doctor’s recommendation. Still, physicians are restricted to prescribing only 4 ounces per patient per two-week period.

9. The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System has not shown any severe problems with marijuana use for ALS. However, many patients are likely not correctly diagnosed or under-reported because of the numerous state restrictions on medical cannabis and lack of awareness by patients and physicians about its efficacy in treating symptoms associated with ALS, including pain, nausea, and loss of appetite.

10. Long-term effects of marijuana use cannot be determined for ALS patients since data are lacking. Still, there have been no reports of significant adverse events or findings on MRI in cannabis users with the disease.

11. The biggest challenge facing patients is lack of awareness about this treatment among physicians and fear related to its Schedule 1 status.

12. Support is needed further to research the effects of marijuana on ALS symptoms and increase physician awareness about the potential benefits of cannabis treatment for patients with ALS to improve quality of life and potentially prolong survival.

13. For more information on this topic, contact Dr. Sunil Aggarwal at 810-762-7036.

14. For information on our monthly support

 Summary

ALS medical marijuana in michigan has been proven effective for patients with ALS, but there are still questions about its safety and efficacy in treating people with this debilitating disease. Marijuana card helps to take better treatment with effective treatment. The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System has not shown any severe problems with marijuana use for ALS. However, many patients are likely not correctly diagnosed or under-reported because of the numerous state restrictions on medical cannabis and lack of awareness by patients and physicians about its efficacy to treat symptoms associated with it. ALS medical marijuana in michigan including pain, nausea, loss of appetite; long-term effects cannot be determined as data is lacking. The biggest challenge facing patients is the lack of awareness among physicians and fear related to Schedule 1 status. Support needed to further research potential benefits between Marijuana (cannabis)

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