10 Diseases Found In The Human Body Human Body Diseases

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Disease in Human body

The top 10 Human Body Diseases are as follows

Cancer

One of the most dangerous Human Body diseases.

Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by uncontrolled growth and the spread of abnormal cells. It affects nearly every organ in the body.

There are two types of cancer: solid tumors and hematologic cancers. Hematologic cancers include leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and Hodgkin’s disease. Solid tumors include breast, lung, colon, prostate, kidney, bladder, thyroid, liver, pancreas, stomach, esophagus, cervix, uterus, ovary, testis, brain, bone, head and neck, and melanoma.

There are two types of cancer: solid tumors and hematologic cancers. Solid tumors form from cells that grow abnormally and divide uncontrollably. Hematologic cancers develop from blood cells. These cancers include leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and Hodgkin’s disease.

Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder caused when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body cannot effectively use the insulin produced. Insulin helps move glucose into cells where energy is needed. If there is too little insulin, blood sugar levels rise. This leads to symptoms such as increased thirst and hunger, blurred vision, fatigue, weight loss, frequent urination, and slow healing of cuts and wounds.

The human body has two main types of cells: red blood cells and white blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout the body, while white blood cells fight off infections. There are many other systems in the body, such as the digestive tract, which includes the stomach, intestines, liver, pancreas, gallbladder, spleen, and appendix. These systems work together to help our bodies function properly.

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The human body has several different systems that work together to keep us alive. These systems include the circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, nervous system, endocrine system, immune system, musculoskeletal system, reproductive system, urinary system, and excretory system. Each of these systems has its own unique functions, which is why we have such diverse health problems. For example, diabetes affects the blood sugar level, which is controlled by the pancreas. If the pancreas does not function properly, then the blood sugar level becomes too high or too low. High blood sugar levels cause damage to the nerves, kidneys, and other organs. Low blood sugar levels can lead to coma or death.

Heart Disease

A healthy diet and exercise habits can help prevent heart disease. However, some people develop heart disease even though they eat well and exercise regularly. These people often have high cholesterol, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, high LDL cholesterol, or other abnormalities in lipoproteins.

The human body has several systems that work together to keep us alive. These systems include the circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, nervous system, endocrine system, immune system, musculoskeletal system, reproductive system, urinary system, and excretory system. Each of these systems plays a role in keeping our bodies functioning properly.

The human body has several systems that work together to keep us alive. These systems include the respiratory system, circulatory system, digestive system, nervous system, endocrine system, immune system, musculoskeletal system, reproductive system, and the integumentary system. Each of these systems has its own unique function. For example, the respiratory system helps us breathe, the circulatory system transports oxygen throughout our bodies, the digestive system breaks down food into nutrients, the nervous system allows us to think and move, the endocrine system controls hormones, and the immune system protects us from disease, the musculoskeletal systems allow us to stand upright, the reproductive system gives birth to new life, and the integumentary system keeps us protected from the elements.

Stroke

Strokes occur when blood flow to part of the brain stops. This usually happens because of a blockage in an artery. Symptoms of a stroke include sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm, leg, or one side of the body; confusion; trouble speaking or understanding speech; trouble seeing in one or both eyes; dizziness, headache, loss of balance or coordination; and fainting.

The brain is one of the most important parts of our bodies. It controls everything we do and think. If something goes wrong with the brain, it could cause problems with other organs. A stroke happens when blood flow to the brain stops. When this happens, cells die because there isn’t enough oxygen and nutrients. Strokes happen when blood vessels become blocked due to atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), high cholesterol levels, or diabetes.

When we think of our bodies, we usually think of our brains. However, there are other parts of the body that work together to keep us alive. One of these parts is called the circulatory system. The circulatory system consists of blood vessels, arteries, veins, capillaries, and lymph nodes. Blood vessels carry oxygenated blood throughout the body. Arteries carry blood away from the heart and into smaller blood vessels called capillaries. Capillaries then carry blood back to the heart. Veins return blood to the heart. Lymph nodes filter waste products from the blood.

Kidney Failure

A kidney failure occurs when the kidneys stop functioning properly. It can happen due to a number of reasons, such as high blood pressure, infection, injury, or certain medications. If left untreated, it can lead to death.

The kidneys are one of the most important organs in our bodies. They help remove waste from the blood and regulate fluid levels in the body. If the kidneys fail, then the patient will suffer from kidney failure. There are two types of kidney failure: acute and chronic. Acute kidney failure occurs suddenly and usually results from a medical condition such as dehydration or poisoning. Chronic kidney failure happens gradually and often results from diabetes or high blood pressure.

The kidneys are one of the most important organs in our bodies. They help regulate blood pressure, remove waste products from the bloodstream, and control water balance. If the kidneys fail, then we can develop kidney failure.

Skin Tissue

There are three main types of skin tissue: epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue. The epidermis is the outermost layer of skin. It consists of two layers: stratum corneum and stratum lucidum. The stratum corneum is composed of dead keratinocytes (skin cells) and is responsible for protecting the body against water loss. Stratum lucidum is made up of living keratinocytes and contains hair follicles. The dermis is the middle layer of the skin. It has four layers: papillary dermis, reticular dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous fat. Subcutaneous fat is the deepest layer of skin. It protects internal organs and provides insulation.

Connective Tissues

Connective tissues are found throughout the human body. They provide support and protection for other structures. Examples of connective tissues include ligaments, tendons, cartilage, bone, fascia, and periosteum. Ligaments attach bones to other bones. Tendons connect muscles to bones. Cartilage is a tough, rubbery material that cushions joints. Bone is a hard substance that makes up our skeleton. Fascia is a thin sheet of fibrous tissue that surrounds muscle groups and organs. The periosteum is a membrane that covers the bone.

Muscle Tissue

Muscles are made up of bundles of cells called myofibers. Myofibers are surrounded by a thick layer of connective tissue called the endomysium. The endomysium contains blood vessels, nerves, lymphatic channels, and capillaries. The outermost layer of the muscle is called the epimysium. It consists of dense connective tissue containing collagen fibers. Collagen provides strength to the muscle.

Respiratory Tissue

Nerve tissue samples are usually stained using a special stain called hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). This stains the cell nuclei blue and cytoplasm pink. Other common stains used for nerve tissue samples include Luxol fast blue and periodic acid–Schiff (PAS) staining.
Brain tissue samples are also stained using H&E. However, unlike nerve tissue samples, brain tissue samples are not fixed before being processed. Instead, they are frozen and then cut into thin slices. These slices are then mounted onto slides and stained.

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